Monday, September 03, 2012

Super WiFi

 

A new wireless technology coming.

"Super Wi-Fi," which offers a bigger range than existing hotspots, is being deployed in the United States.  Currently wireless N technology is the fastest you can get when it comes to 3G/4G routers.

Super Wi-Fi is not really Wi-Fi because it uses a different frequency and requires specially designed equipment, but it offers some of Wi-Fi's advantages, and more. The name was coined by the US Federal Communications Commission in 2010, when it approved the deployment of unused broadcast television spectrum, or so-called "white spaces," for wireless broadband.
The long range and use of the broadcast spectrum could allow wireless signals to travel farther than Wi-Fi -- in theory as far as 100 miles (160 kilometers) -- although for practical reasons the range will probably be only a few miles.

The first deployment of Super Wi-Fi came last year by Rice University in Houston, Texas, followed by another earlier this year in Wilmington, North Carolina.

A coalition of organizations has announced plans to deploy Super Wi-Fi to college campuses in rural areas starting early next year in a project called AIR.U, backed by Google and Microsoft.

Super Wi-Fi would be on "unlicensed" spectrum, like Wi-Fi, so companies would not bid on exclusive spectrum rights. This can lower costs. And there is often excess capacity, especially in rural areas. Mobile phone companies could use Super Wi-Fi, as they do now with Wi-Fi, to relieve some of the "spectrum crunch" from the explosion of mobile devices like smartphones and tablets.